Parkland Press

Monday, October 23, 2017
PRESS PHOTOS BY WENDY WRIGHTStudents at Orefield Middle School kicked off their anti-bullying day Sept. 15 by taking a pledge to stand up against bullying. PRESS PHOTOS BY WENDY WRIGHTStudents at Orefield Middle School kicked off their anti-bullying day Sept. 15 by taking a pledge to stand up against bullying.
Students in Amy Boltz’s and Joey Lee’s sixth-grade classes work on a team building exercise – the Marshmallow Challenge. Teams must work together with spaghetti, marshmallows, string and tape to see who could build the tallest structure. Students in Amy Boltz’s and Joey Lee’s sixth-grade classes work on a team building exercise – the Marshmallow Challenge. Teams must work together with spaghetti, marshmallows, string and tape to see who could build the tallest structure.
Educators make good teammates, too. Brian Fulmer, Mike Palazzo, and Marcia Stay operate a giant slingshot to see if they can beat out the other homeroom teams in the giant slingshot challenge. Educators make good teammates, too. Brian Fulmer, Mike Palazzo, and Marcia Stay operate a giant slingshot to see if they can beat out the other homeroom teams in the giant slingshot challenge.

It’s no bull: Orefield Middle School doesn’t stand for bullying

Thursday, September 28, 2017 by WENDY WRIGHT Special to The Press in School

Orefield Middle School students have once again pledged to take a stand against bullying.

This is the fourth year OMS had its anti-bullying event.

Everyone at the school – students, teachers and staff — took part in team building games and activities Sept. 15.

Monica Ouly-Uhl, an assistant principal at OMS and a key organizer of the event, said spending time with teachers during this event has a significant impact on the students.

“They get to see how important it [anti-bullying] is to the staff,” she said.

At one point during the day, students watched a video put together by Ouly-Uhl.

The video, which included clips and photos of many teachers, staff, bus drivers, and cafeteria workers, stressed the importance of being kind to each other and sticking together to prevent bullying in school.

Ouly-Uhl said they really want the children to know if anything is wrong or if they need anything they can report it to anyone.

The main message of this event, Ouly-Uhl said, is to “prevent bullying through kindness.”

“Orefield Middle School teachers and staff want the kids to focus on the positive in an upbeat, fun, and memorable way,” she said. “If you’re being kind, you’re not being mean to each other.”

The school recently received a bullying prevention award from the International Bullying Prevention Association.

This award included a $5,000 grant for the school’s bullying prevention program along with free registration for four staff members to the organization’s annual conference.