Parkland Press

Monday, June 17, 2019
PRESS PHOTOS BY ANITA HIRSCHMom Dina Relles of Zionsville holds baby, Lane, as Superman, Gray, looks over and picks out a prize from the table full of choices. PRESS PHOTOS BY ANITA HIRSCHMom Dina Relles of Zionsville holds baby, Lane, as Superman, Gray, looks over and picks out a prize from the table full of choices.
Sam Leisawitz of South Whitehall holds his snake prize while enjoying an ice cream treat. Sam Leisawitz of South Whitehall holds his snake prize while enjoying an ice cream treat.
Friends look over their prizes and snack on ice cream and hamantaschen. Friends look over their prizes and snack on ice cream and hamantaschen.
Press photo by Anita HirschRabbi Moshe Re’em of Temple Beth El dressed for Purim as a clown. Press photo by Anita HirschRabbi Moshe Re’em of Temple Beth El dressed for Purim as a clown.
One of the readers for the Purim service was Jeannie Miller, who dressed as a chef. One of the readers for the Purim service was Jeannie Miller, who dressed as a chef.

Temple Beth El observes Purim holiday

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 by ANITA HIRSCH Special to The Press in Local News

Temple Beth El, South Whitehall, recently sponsored an evening of fun to observe the holiday of Purim.

Long ago, Prime Minister Haman and King Ahashuerus decided to exterminate the Jews in Persia.

But Queen Esther, revealed she was a Jew, so when the king heard that, he had Haman killed.

At the Purim service, whenever the name of Haman is read, all those in attendance want to make noise to drown out the name Haman.

So it was a noisy service on Feb. 28, and any way they could drown out the name that name, they did, especially with a noisemaker such as a gragger and there also was a horse whinnier present.

Readers of the story of Esther at the service were Adina Re’em, Rabbi Re’em, Miriam Kiss, Henry Luftman, Miriam Harris-Botzum, Marla Melman, Jeannie Miller and Shari Spark.

During Purim, it is traditional for children and adults to dress up and parade around. There were also games, crafts and fun. The central element of the holiday is joy and celebration.

After the service, attendees went to the auditorium for ice cream and hamantaschen, three-cornered pastries containing filling, such as poppy seeds or prunes, traditionally eaten during Purim.

Most came in costume and prizes were given for the best.

There were basketball hoops, throw down the clown, bowling games, throw the ball to push over the cans on the table, and lots of prizes at the prize table manned by Cheryl Block.