Parkland Press

Friday, October 19, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY ANITA HIRSCHAfter hatching, the chicks were kept warm in a brooder box at Parkland Community Library, South Whitehall Township, before being returned to Quiver Farm. PRESS PHOTO BY ANITA HIRSCHAfter hatching, the chicks were kept warm in a brooder box at Parkland Community Library, South Whitehall Township, before being returned to Quiver Farm.
Paper chicks were posted at Parkland Community Library with suggestions for names. Paper chicks were posted at Parkland Community Library with suggestions for names.
PRESS PHOTO BY ANITA HIRSCHGraham Lauer, Aubrey Flueso, Doris Rismiller, Caden’s grandmother, Caden Murray, and Madison Talago sit in a circle on the floor to see and touch the chicks up close. PRESS PHOTO BY ANITA HIRSCHGraham Lauer, Aubrey Flueso, Doris Rismiller, Caden’s grandmother, Caden Murray, and Madison Talago sit in a circle on the floor to see and touch the chicks up close.

Checkin’ out the chicks

Thursday, April 26, 2018 by ANITA HIRSCH Special to The Press in Local News

‘Egg-citing’ program offered at library

Early in April, Parkland Community Library, South Whitehall, received a dozen eggs from Quiver Farm, Pennsburg.

The eggs were placed in an incubator to keep warm and everyone who visited the library eagerly awaited for them to hatch. They didn’t have to wait long.

By the beginning of the second week, the eggs were hatching and the cute little brown and golden chicks came to life and were placed in a brooder box.

Library visitors were invited to give suggestions for names for the peeps.

The ideas were written on paper chicks and posted in the library.

The names chosen for the chicks were: Albert “Egg” stein, Beaker, Brownie, Cheerio, “Egg” itha, Fluffy, “Chick”let, Maurice “Hen” Dac, “Shell” Silverstein, Theodor Geis “Shell” and Yoshi.

Children were invited to the library to pet the chicks on April 12.

Youth Services Librarian Jaclyn Hoimes explained to the 3- and 4-year-olds how they should touch the chicks.

The youngsters had to wash their hands first with soap and water and then only touch the chicks with two fingers.

Afterward, their hands had to be washed again, so they did not get germs from the chicks.

Hoimes read a book to the youngsters as they sat in a circle on the floor.

A few chicks were then released into the middle of the circle on a piece of plastic.

After they washed their hands again, the kids went on an egg hunt for plastic colorful eggs, which were hidden around the library.

The chicks have now returned to their home at the Quiver Farm.