Parkland Press

Wednesday, August 15, 2018
PRESS PHOTOS BY STEPHEN ALTHOUSECedar Crest student Kari Vanderslice practices yoga with a furry friend during a goat yoga session May 1 at the college. PRESS PHOTOS BY STEPHEN ALTHOUSECedar Crest student Kari Vanderslice practices yoga with a furry friend during a goat yoga session May 1 at the college.
Students Autumn Wilhide and Victoria Danner, taking a photo with her cellphone, have fun taking part in goat yoga at Cedar Crest College to ease any stress from final exams. Students Autumn Wilhide and Victoria Danner, taking a photo with her cellphone, have fun taking part in goat yoga at Cedar Crest College to ease any stress from final exams.

The cool ‘kids’ go to Cedar Crest College

Thursday, May 24, 2018 by Stephen althouse Special to The Press in Local News

Goat yoga helps ease exam jitters

You’ve heard of goat cheese. How about goat’s milk?

There’s goat hoof trimmers and Billy Goat Industries Inc.

The Stones broke your heart on Goat Head’s Soup.

Heard about “goat yoga?” Seriously. Goat yoga.

If you haven’t, don’t worry.

Unscientifically, most goats are oblivious to this postmodern foray into health and self-enlightenment.

A few cultured and lucky goats — the cool kids — know the score and received an up-close and personal view into a mind-body yoga workout May 1 at Cedar Crest College, Allentown.

The Final Countdown

Spring is a time of rebirth and for college students, a time for year-end final exams.

Nerves frazzle, stress shoots through the roof as students try to remember things they forgot, or learn things they never knew in the first place.

Recognizing some students need to relax, the college’s Office of Student Affairs organized two goat yoga sessions.

Both sessions were a hit as student registration soared, according to Mary-Alice Ozechoski, the college’s vice president of Student Affairs and Traditional Enrollment.

Goat yoga is traditional yoga practiced in tandem with live goats.

It’s true, goats have adroit gymnastic, prancing and gymnastic abilities, but goat yoga is not yoga for goats.

Rather, they play the role therapy animals would during a normal yoga class.

They also do a lot of “hanging out.”

As many as 30 Cedar Crest College students participated in each session held on the lawn near Steinbright Hall, under the direction of Water and Rock Studio, a Philadelphia-based company, which is identified as having “highly-trained” yogi.

Uncomplicated Agendas

While Cedar Crest students were channeling their devotional warrior and revolved half moon poses, their furry four-legged friends wandered around seemingly unfazed by the sight of more than two dozen individuals focusing on breathing and searching for their “intention.”

In the parlance, the goats were chilling. The fuzzy, big-eyed animals sought close encounters of the human kind.

Some goats sat on the mats, others nuzzled like chicks to their mothers, while one brazen herd member even walked on a participant.

The animals’ motive wasn’t complicated: They were seeking affection.

Did their advances get turned down? You’ve goat to be joking.

Whether goat yoga is a trend with the lasting power of pop music or Beethoven remains to be seen.

One thing is for sure: in today’s world, a herd of goats helped dozens of college students understand they don’t always have to take their finals so seriously.