Parkland Press

Tuesday, March 19, 2019
PRESS PHOTOS BY ANITA HIRSCHStudents were given drawings of various bugs, animals, vegetables and fruits to guess how much water each one contains. The mission at Station 7 was to match the plant or animal with the corresponding amount of water. Luke O”Reilly from Springhouse Middle School points out lettuce contains the most amount of water. PRESS PHOTOS BY ANITA HIRSCHStudents were given drawings of various bugs, animals, vegetables and fruits to guess how much water each one contains. The mission at Station 7 was to match the plant or animal with the corresponding amount of water. Luke O”Reilly from Springhouse Middle School points out lettuce contains the most amount of water.
Jasmine Deol and Kyla Smith from Kernsville Elementary enjoyed Station 8, the Incredible Journey. Large dice were rolled and the students saw how water moves in the world within the water cycle. With each roll of the dice, a colored bead could be added to a bracelet they could take home. Jasmine Deol and Kyla Smith from Kernsville Elementary enjoyed Station 8, the Incredible Journey. Large dice were rolled and the students saw how water moves in the world within the water cycle. With each roll of the dice, a colored bead could be added to a bracelet they could take home.
Students from Kernsville Elementary were interested in a demonstration showing how multiple water users affect available water resources. Danielle Hoster, a volunteer from Nestle Waters, explains to Kenzie Wehr and Braden Bleiler how users of water can pollute the water supply. Students from Kernsville Elementary were interested in a demonstration showing how multiple water users affect available water resources. Danielle Hoster, a volunteer from Nestle Waters, explains to Kenzie Wehr and Braden Bleiler how users of water can pollute the water supply.
Groups of students from Springhouse and Kernsville schools were divided into teams to carry a canoe with supplies in the Resource Races. The teams were to relay watershed resources to industry and manufactured goods to market with a land canoe. They raced carrying the canoe from station to station. Groups of students from Springhouse and Kernsville schools were divided into teams to carry a canoe with supplies in the Resource Races. The teams were to relay watershed resources to industry and manufactured goods to market with a land canoe. They raced carrying the canoe from station to station.

Students learn about water at Pool Wildlife Sanctuary

Wednesday, December 5, 2018 by ANITA HIRSCH Special to The Press in School

Students from seven area schools recently attended a special event at Pool Wildlife Sanctuary, Emmaus.

About 1,300 school children were transported to the sanctuary for a water education festival called Make a Splash with “Project Wet.”

Students from the Parkland area were represented by Springhouse Middle School and Kernsville Elementary School during the morning session.

Various activities, at 21 stations that the children could visit, demonstrated how water is beneficial and how to protect the vital life-sustaining force.

This was the 15th annual festival and one of the largest in the nation.

Station seven, called “How Full of it Are They,” illustrated the amount of water in living things.

Students had to match the plant or animal with its corresponding amount of water.

Station 14 was The Resource Race during which two teams used canoes.

The goal was to point out how canals had been used to move products from farms to industry to market via the land and the canals.

Nestle Water employee volunteers and Wildlands staff led the program.

A teacher or adult volunteer accompanied each group.

There were 65 volunteers who assisted during the day.