Parkland Press

Saturday, February 23, 2019
Bunny and Stephen Schwartz from Building Block Workshop in Livingston, N.J., and David Caine, the parent of a child in the religious school, put together the base of the giant menorah. The children put together the basic block shapes for the base on Dec. 1, the first night of Hanukkah, at Temple Beth El’s annual Hanukkah party.PRESS PHOTOS BY ANITA HIRSCH Bunny and Stephen Schwartz from Building Block Workshop in Livingston, N.J., and David Caine, the parent of a child in the religious school, put together the base of the giant menorah. The children put together the basic block shapes for the base on Dec. 1, the first night of Hanukkah, at Temple Beth El’s annual Hanukkah party.PRESS PHOTOS BY ANITA HIRSCH
Jacob Schorr and Jack Edelman, using LEGOs, construct eyewear for themselves. Jacob Schorr and Jack Edelman, using LEGOs, construct eyewear for themselves.
Stephen Schwartz places the top of the giant menorah on the base. Stephen Schwartz places the top of the giant menorah on the base.
Continuing with the fun, Zander Volchko enjoys a doughnut (sufganiot). Continuing with the fun, Zander Volchko enjoys a doughnut (sufganiot).
Rachel Shurman serves potato latkes to the hungry crowd at the Hanukkah party. Rachel Shurman serves potato latkes to the hungry crowd at the Hanukkah party.

Temple Beth El constructs giant menorah with LEGOs

Wednesday, December 19, 2018 by ANITA HIRSCH Special to The Press in Local News

On Dec. 1, the first night of Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, was celebrated at Temple Beth El, South Whitehall, during its annual Hanukkah party.

Stephen Schwartz, of the Building Block Workshop, Livingston, N.J., showed the children, how to construct a giant menorah with LEGOs during the annual Hanukkah party.

Construction began about 9 a.m. and two hours later the menorah was completed.

Then, the party began.

Food, in particular potato pancakes or latkes and sufganiot, the Hebrew word for doughnut, were available.

These two foods are the highlight because they are fried in oil to remind Jewish people around the world the reason for the celebration.

Hanukkah celebrates rededicating the Temple in Jerusalem after Syrians desecrated the holy.

In the year 3622, (165 B.C.) the Jews were victorious in the battle against the Syrians.

When the new altar was built, they looked for oil to light the menorah only a small amount was found.

This was lighted, but was only expected to stay lit for one day. Instead, the oil burned for eight days until more was available.

This miracle is what is celebrated by lighting candles for eight days.

Crafts, raffles, dreidels and music rounded out the afternoon.