Parkland Press

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Respectfully Yours: business cards

Thursday, April 19, 2018 by JACQUELYN YOUST in Focus

Dear Jacquelyn,

I attend numerous networking events and I am presented with many business cards. In the moment, I find myself trying not to break eye contact and stare at the card. What should I do when someone hands me his or her business card? And what’s the proper way to present one?

Dear Reader, I want to start by giving you a little history on business card handling. Japanese protocol teaches us everything we know about business card protocol.

Veteran journalist pens Northampton County history book

Thursday, April 19, 2018 by GEORGE VANDOREN in Focus

Local residents of a certain age can catalogue a host of changes they’ve witnessed in Northampton County over the years.

Veteran Lehigh Valley journalist and professor Glenn Kranzley has covered all the bases in his new book, “Still Changing, Still Home: Northampton County Since the 1950s.” He catches it all: from shrinking farmland to the traffic crunch, the economy, environment, culture, sports - you name it.

Kranzley presents a lecture, “Northampton County After Earth Day,” 2 p.m. April 21, Sigal Museum, 342 Northampton St., Easton.

Ronald Demkee is Mr. Allentown Band

Thursday, April 19, 2018 by GEORGE VANDOREN in Focus

The Allentown Band has a long and storied past, dating back 190 years, to what is said to be its first performance, July 4, 1828.

For the last 41 years, one man has been the face of the Allentown Band: Ronald Demkee.

The band’s conductor started his association with the United States’ oldest civilian concert band as a tubist in 1964 while attending West Chester University. The rest, as they say, is history.

Liebman eclectic, electronic

Thursday, April 19, 2018 by GEORGE VANDOREN in Focus

Saxophone legend Dave Liebman returns to “Jazz Upstairs,” 7:30 p.m. April 20, Rodale Community Room, Miller Symphony Hall, Allentown. This time, he brings keyboardist Bobby Avey to compliment his musical offerings.

Liebman has done it all. He’s a National Endowment for the Arts “Jazz Master.” He has been named first place in the soprano sax category for Jazz Ed, Jazz Times, and Downbeat.

Healthy Geezer: Three questions

Thursday, April 19, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. What percentage of older men have erectile dysfunction (ED)?

The incidence of ED increases with age. Between 15 and 25 percent of 65-year-old men experience this problem. In older men, ED usually has a physical cause, such as a drug side effect, disease or injury. Anything that damages the nerves or impairs blood flow in the penis can cause ED.

The following are some leading causes of erectile dysfunction: diabetes, high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), prostate surgery, hormone imbalance, alcohol and drug abuse.

Ezra Wenner: 75 years and counting with The Allentown Band

Thursday, April 19, 2018 by GEORGE VANDOREN in Focus

The Allentown Band has been a Lehigh Valley institution for 190 years. Ezra Wenner has been an institution in the Allentown Band for 75 years.

That’s 75 years of holding down the trombone chair in one of the United State’s finest concert bands. Wenner, 90, is believed to have played with the Allentown Band for more years than any other musician in the band.

Wenner has received recognition for his longevity in recent years.

In 2015, the Allentown Band board of directors named the band’s west Allentown headquarters Ezra Wenner Hall.

Respectfully Yours: Just say no

Thursday, April 12, 2018 by JACQUELYN YOUST in Focus

Dear Jacquelyn,

I’m a busy working mom of three boys and I have a lot on my plate. When I am asked to do something beyond my already full schedule, I have a habit of saying “Yes” to everyone. I’m starting to feel burnt out and resentful. Is there a way to say “No” without sounding like a bad person?

Dear Reader,

The tiny little word “no” is often the most difficult one to say.

If you are worried about hurting someone’s feelings or causing conflict there are ways to say “no” so that you remain likable. There are guilt-free strategies for saying “no.”